9-Year-Old Girl Aims to Build School Completely from Recycled Materials

0 Shares

A 9-year-old girl from India cares so much about the environment that she plans to build a school completely from recycled materials! She hopes to achieve this through roof sheets and tiles created from single-use plastics.

Though she is still 9 years old, Licypriya Kangujam has made a name for herself as one of the top climate activists from Manipur, India. She is being called by the media as the “Greta of India”, referring to the infamous 17-year-old Swedish environmental activist Greta Thunberg. However, the younger girl refuses to be called that, choosing instead to make a name for herself.

Photo credit: Dilanlekamge / WikiMedia Commons

As a climate activist, Licypriya staunchly advocates against the use of plastics, particularly single-use plastics that are known as one of the top reasons for plastic pollution across the world. She has also found a way to reduce the used plastics already in the environment by converting them into something useful: construction materials!

Photo credit: Licypriya Kangujam

These used plastics are cut into small pieces and combined with sugarcane bagasse under high pressure and temperature to create beautifully crafted roof sheets, tiles, and even things like benches, desks, and whiteboards.

But Licypriya isn’t just thinking about making these items made from recycled materials. She also has grand plans to build a school that’s completely constructed and furnished with these recycled items.

Photo credit: Licypriya Kangujam

Aside from looking stylish with its speckled design, these recycled materials are also lighter, thinner, and considerably cheaper than standard construction materials. But quality is also taken into consideration.

Photo credit: Licypriya Kangujam

These recycled plastics were created with the radiant barrier principle in mind. This ensures that the materials reflect light instead of absorbing it. Thus, the sheets are said to reduce temperatures by five to six degrees Celsius (5-6 °C).

Photo credit: Licypriya Kangujam

This light-reflecting feature is especially useful in tropical countries and can help reduce cooling costs.

0 Shares

Add Comment